Blog

Seashells as a Decorating Medium

Seashells play a bigger part in decorating than one May imagine.  Did you know that Limestone is made of Seashells?  Marble is a more refined version of Limestone, so also contains compressed matter from the sea.   It’s hard to imagine how much of our Earth was once under water, but finding seashell fossils in the Moroccan desert and the […]
Read More

Seashells: The Salt (and Pepper) of the Earth

With shock and dismay I see some pretty awful mid-century kitsch used in design today, and I guess it works in some instances.  Shell kitsch, however, is so bad it’ll never be good. It’s the craftsmanship as well as the tastelessness of the stuff that  makes it so awful. Vintage Shell Art When I tell someone that I make things […]
Read More

More Than Just Mirrors

Lots of seashell mirrors dot hallways and powder rooms all around town here, and all over Los Angeles, Long Island, New York City, Chicago… They serve an obvious and “safe” decorating purpose, and are practical. Using shells in an architectural setting can be interesting, and a little more of a surprise than a mirror or even a chandelier. I just takes a […]
Read More

A Bit of Frothy Seashell History

Plato suggested that, of course, Aphrodite (Venus in Rome) is nude because comtemplation of physical beauty allows the mind to understand and inspire intellectual love. Sounds like a line to me. Plato was in the hobby shop. In Sandro Botticelli’s Venus on the Half Shell (Nascita di Venere) is another sexy beauty nudely standing in the half-clam, with only her […]
Read More

Shells as Religious Symbols and the Meaning of Life

Ah, the Pearly Gates of Heaven.  I’m thinking about them because I recently lost a dear friend, and am thinking that he is meeting St. Peter at those very gates.  According to Revelations, the twelve gates of Heaven are each made from a single pearl.  Of course this is symbolic, or the pearls were rather large (or the gates small..).  […]
Read More

Sailors’ Valentines

When the Dutch started bringing seashells back from travels in the 1550’s, the use of them in art and science was born. Connoisseurs needed to be supplied with rare species for their Cabinets of Curiosity. Cabinets soon graduated to entire rooms, which appeared, with their magic, in Renaissance gardens, Louis XIV’s Grotto of Thetis at Versailles and Marie Antoinette’s shell […]
Read More